How do you photograph a funeral?

In British culture we seem very averse to showing emotion or embracing and remembering that part of our life – death.

On this topic, one of my university lecturers spoke of a time she was asked to photograph a Sikh funeral. Despite her reluctance and the families persistence she eventually did. The purpose was not to document a families pain but to celebrate the life of the departed.

I feel British funerals, whether they’re agnostic or Christian, are not yet at the point of being open to the presence of a camera at a funeral.

Today we say farewell and lay to rest Joan Stevens. Joan, being my wife’s nan who practically raised her, was also my children’s last surviving great grandparent. Being something of a hobbyist florist, my mother-in-law wanted to prepare the flowers. This became a family occasion and a chance to start celebrating the life we will gather to remember later today.

Taking Pictures of People Taking Pictures

In a world of smart phones and digital photography we all have a high quality camera in our pockets and at our fingertips.  This results more than ever in a desire to document everything around us.  Whether it’s the food we eat or the places we go, photography is all around us everyday.

Taking Photos of People Taking Photos is an ongoing body of work looking at our relationship with photography.  When visiting iconic tourist hotspots why is it our first choice to capture a photograph of ourselves stood infront of that location or structure?  The notion seems to be that unless we have photographic proof of our experience then did it really happen?

Vol 1. – Paris

Vol 2. – Stonehenge

Taking Photos of People Taking Photos – Volume I – book

The first of many photo books. Taking Photos of People Taking Photos – Volume I is a set of images from Paris. The work focuses on the obsession to photograph ones self with a famous landmark rather than enjoying it. The belief almost that if you don’t take the picture did you really visit?